Important Facts

Check out a great place for recipes: Cookbook.pdf
Sleep needed for each day:

Birth to 2 months old: 16-18 hours
2-6 months: 14-16 hours
6-12 months: 13-15 hours
1-3 years: 12-14 hours
3-5 years: 11-13 hours
5-12 years: 10-11 hours
12-18 years: 8.5-9.5

Quotes from Great People:

“God is for you. Turn to the sidelines;
That’s God cheering your run.
Look past the finish line;
That’s God applauding your steps.
Listen for him in the bleachers,
shouting your name.
Too tired to continue?
He’ll carry you.
Too discouraged to fight?
He’s picking you up.
God is for you.”

Max Lucado, In the Grip of Grace




Is your child starting school soon? Here are a few ideas that might help in the transition for the typical child:
• Discuss with your child some of the changes that will soon take place during his day.
• Together make a picture chart of what the new schedule will consist of.
• Encourage him to talk about how he is feeling about the new schedule and any fears.
• Reading books about this time of transition may help your child see how others deal with it.*
• Go and visit the classroom early if you can.
• Try to meet the teacher before school begins.
• Buy school supplies and place in a special box or backpack for them to look through. (Don’t let them use them until they get to school).
• Have fun picking out a pair of pajamas to wear the night before school.
• Perhaps even have a special new outfit; and have them help to lay it out the day before.
• A week before school begins, start to get up with the new morning routine to help with the transition.
• Arrange a play date with another child from the class before school starts.
• Talk about how they will get to school (bus, car, walk) and go through the routine. Discuss any fears they may have.
• On the first few days, arrive early so they can have a slower and smoother transition.
• When it is time to leave, say good-bye, and explain that you will see them at the end of the school day.
• Explain where you will pick them up or where you will see them next.

*Books to read to help with transition:
Timothy Goes to School: Rosemary Wells (Dial Books for Young Children)
Will I have a Friend?: Miriam Cohen, illustrated by Lillian Hoban (Macmillan)
**Resources for this article are from the National Association for the Education of Young Children and a book by So Many Goodbyes, by J.B. McCracken.

Creating Fun Summer Memories
Do you have access to a tent? If not, create one in the back yard for your child to play in for fun summer memories. This can be made with a blanket over the clothes line or over a tree limb, or picnic table. Lay a blanket or quilt on the ground to lie on under the tent. Other things that could be added might be a sleeping bag, flashlight, small cooler, water bottles, and pretend campfire and cooking items. As night time comes, have fun watching the stars come out.


Quotes from Great People:

“God is for you. Turn to the sidelines;
That’s God cheering your run.
Look past the finish line;
That’s God applauding your steps.
Listen for him in the bleachers,
shouting your name.
Too tired to continue?
He’ll carry you.
Too discouraged to fight?
He’s picking you up.
God is for you.”

Max Lucado, In the Grip of Grace



Sleep needed for each day:

Birth to 2 months old: 16-18 hours
2-6 months: 14-16 hours
6-12 months: 13-15 hours
1-3 years: 12-14 hours
3-5 years: 11-13 hours
5-12 years: 10-11 hours
12-18 years: 8.5-9.5


GOING TO SCHOOL?
Is your child starting school soon? Here are a few ideas that might help in the transition for the typical child:
• Discuss with your child some of the changes that will soon take place during his day.
• Together make a picture chart of what the new schedule will consist of.
• Encourage him to talk about how he is feeling about the new schedule and any fears.
• Reading books about this time of transition may help your child see how others deal with it.*
• Go and visit the classroom early if you can.
• Try to meet the teacher before school begins.
• Buy school supplies and place in a special box or backpack for them to look through. (Don’t let them use them until they get to school).
• Have fun picking out a pair of pajamas to wear the night before school.
• Perhaps even have a special new outfit; and have them help to lay it out the day before.
• A week before school begins, start to get up with the new morning routine to help with the transition.
• Arrange a play date with another child from the class before school starts.
• Talk about how they will get to school (bus, car, walk) and go through the routine. Discuss any fears they may have.
• On the first few days, arrive early so they can have a slower and smoother transition.
• When it is time to leave, say good-bye, and explain that you will see them at the end of the school day.
• Explain where you will pick them up or where you will see them next.

*Books to read to help with transition:
Timothy Goes to School: Rosemary Wells (Dial Books for Young Children)
Will I have a Friend?: Miriam Cohen, illustrated by Lillian Hoban (Macmillan)
**Resources for this article are from the National Association for the Education of Young Children and a book by So Many Goodbyes, by J.B. McCracken.

Creating Fun Summer Memories
Do you have access to a tent? If not, create one in the back yard for your child to play in for fun summer memories. This can be made with a blanket over the clothes line or over a tree limb, or picnic table. Lay a blanket or quilt on the ground to lie on under the tent. Other things that could be added might be a sleeping bag, flashlight, small cooler, water bottles, and pretend campfire and cooking items. As night time comes, have fun watching the stars come out.

Reading Aloud Stimulates Child Development
*Reading aloud to children helps stimulate brain development, yet only 50% of infants and toddlers are routinely read to by their parents.

Working Memory Stores Seven Digits
*It’s no accident that telephone numbers in the United States are seven digits long. Our working memory, a very short-term form of memory which stores ideas just long enough for us to understand them, can hold on average a maximum of seven digits. This allows you to look up a phone number and remember it just long enough to dial.

*Quotes from Brainconnection.com Library
Pre-Reading Words for Activity
1st 100 Word’s to know:
a, about, after, again, all, an, and, any, are, as, at, be, been, before, boy, but, by, can, come, day, did, do, down, eat, for, from, get, give, go, good, had, has, have, he, her, here, him, his, how, I, if, in, is, it, just, know, good, little, long, make, man, many, me, much, my, new, no, not, of, old, on, one, or, other, our, out, put, said, see, she, so, some, take, that, the, their, them, then, there, they, this, three, to, put, said, us, very, was, we, were, what, when, which, who, will, with, work, would, you, your, two, up.


Things to keep in mind:
Children will progress at their own pace. The ages for the activities are general guidelines to go with. Remember to start with an activity they feel confident in, and then build to the next step or level of the activity.

Did you know?
At 4 years old Albert Einstein finally started speaking. He did not learn to read until he was already 7.
Walt Disney was fired by a newspaper editor because he did not have any “good ideas”.
Thomas Edison’s teachers told him he was too stupid to learn anything.


Source: Developing Students’ Multiple Intelligences

Did you know:
The success of Mr. Roger’s children’s program years ago may be attributed to his rate of words per minute…..Audio professor Ray Hull says “the secret to getting children to truly listen isn’t speaking up—it’s slowing down.”
The average adult speaks at 170 words per minute. Children around the age of 5 tend to speak at the rate of 120 words per minute. Hull explains if adults would slow down as they talk, children might listen and understand more.
Try an experiment with your own family and see if it works…
*Facts from The Wichita Shocker Alumni magazine, Fall 2008, page 20.

Tools for Motherhood Websites to check out:

www.abcteach.com
This site provides little booklets you could make with your child to encourage reading readiness or a booklet about shapes or about a summer vacation. The pages could have a photo put on it, and you and your child could describe what you are doing on the pages. This would create your story. Perhaps it might be included in some of your bedtime routines to help build memories about the fun event.

www.cutecolors.com
This is a fun website with cute clipart. Perhaps you are helping with VBS or Sunday School and you would like some fun clipart for advertising or displays.


Fun Facts:

Why we scratch an itch--- like a mosquito bite.

“Scratching an itch is a puzzling biological response because it seems to hinder rather than help a wound’s healing. One theory of why we itch suggests that scratching stimulates the release of endorphins, naturally occurring opiates which block pain sensation. Because scratching injures our skin a little more, we release a flood of endorphins to block the pain of the initial injury more effectively.”

*Brainconnection website


A Hundred Years From Now
It will not matter
What my bank account was,
The sort of house I lived in,
or the kind of car I drove--
But the world may be different
Because I made a difference...
in the life of my child.


With the start of the New Year, show your child how to do the following household chores and then include them into their weekly routine of life. Have you considered adding in a small amount for an allowance to cover their work? It may give them a beginning foundation of money management.
Dust furniture
Set table
Feed a pet
Clean plates from table
Fold washcloths and small towels
Water house plants and spray with a sprayer
Help put canned groceries away

Games that reinforce math Concepts
Candyland
Chutes and Ladders
Dominoes
Legos (patterns)
Monopoly Jr.
Playing Cards
Uno
Hi Ho Cherry Oh
Trouble





RECYCLE THE FOLLOWING ITEMS AND USE FOR ACTIVITIES
foam meat trays
plastic strawberry baskets
plastic tomota baskets
old magazines
used wrapping paper
old newspapers
used greeting and holiday cards
styrofoam packing peanuts
large cardboard boxes
plastic cups
junk mail advertisements
rubber bands
plastic tabs from loaves of bread
twist ties
metal bandage containers
platic pantyhose eggs
egg cartons
plastic milk cartons
old calendars
scraps of colored paper
free stickers
cottage cheese, yogurt and sour cream tubs (and lids)
old, clean socks
old, adult-sized shirts

YOGURT POPSICLES**
1 cup plain yogart
1 banana, sliced
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup unsweetened fruit juice or fruit chunks
Mix all ingredients in blender.
Pour mixture into paper cups.
Place plastic spoons into center of each cup so when frozen, they will work as a handle.
Freeze. Makes 4-5 popsicles
**From: Totline Books: SuperSnacks, Jean Warren & Glen Mulvey, p. 39.

PRE-WRITING MILESTONES
According to the “Child Development Chart” under the category of Fine Motor, here are some “milestones” to look for in your child’s development:
These tend to be general but remember all children develop at their own pace.

6 months- Picks up a toy with one hand,Looks at. Reaches for faces and toys.
9 months – Transfers a toy from one hand to the other. Uses two hands to pick up large objects.
12 months- Picks up small objects; precise thumb and finger grasp.
18 months- Stacks two or more blocks. Picks up two small toys in one hand. Scribbles with crayon.
2 years- Builds towers of four or more blocks. Turns pages of picture books, one at a time.
2 years 6 months- Scribbles with circular motion. Draws or copies vertical lines.
3 years- Cuts with small scissors.
3 years 6 months- Draws or copies a complete circle. Cuts across paper with small scissors.
4 years- Draws recognizable pictures.
4 years 6 months- Draws a person that has at least three parts – head, eyes, nose, mouth, etc.
5 years- Prints first name (four letters).



Here are some ideas that could include your young child in some household chores...Include them into their weekly routine of life. Have you considered adding in a small amount for an allowance to cover their work? It may give them a beginning foundation of money management.
Dust furniture
Set table
Feed a pet
Clean plates from table
Fold washcloths and small towels
Water house plants and spray with a sprayer
Help put canned groceries away

Games that reinforce math Concepts
Candyland
Chutes and Ladders
Dominoes
Legos (patterns)
Monopoly Jr.
Playing Cards
Uno
Hi Ho Cherry Oh
Trouble

10 Preschool Book Ideas
Are You My Mother? PD Eastman
The Cat in the Hat, and other books by Dr. Seuss
Courduroy, Don Freeman
Curious George, Hans Rey
Goodnight Moon, Margaret Wise Brown
Harry the Dirty Dog, Gene Zion
The Little Engine That Could, Waltty Piper
The Snowy Day, Ezra Jack Keats
The very Hungry Caterpillar, Eric Carle
Winnie-the-Pooh, A.A. Milne

Reading Aloud Stimulates Child Development
*Reading aloud to children helps stimulate brain development, yet only 50% of infants and toddlers are routinely read to by their parents.

Working Memory Stores Seven Digits
*It’s no accident that telephone numbers in the United States are seven digits long. Our working memory, a very short-term form of memory which stores ideas just long enough for us to understand them, can hold on average a maximum of seven digits. This allows you to look up a phone number and remember it just long enough to dial.

*Quotes from Brainconnection.com Library

In the Focus on the Family December 2008 issue, they listed out the amount of sleep needed per day for children. The facts came from the website called AboutKidsHealth.ca. You may want to check it out for other facts as well.

Sleep needed for each day:

Birth to 2 months old: 16-18 hours
2-6 months: 14-16 hours
6-12 months: 13-15 hours
1-3 years: 12-14 hours
3-5 years: 11-13 hours
5-12 years: 10-11 hours
12-18 years: 8.5-9.5


Quotes from Great People: “God is for you. Turn to the sidelines; That’s God cheering your run. Look past the finish line; That’s God applauding your steps. Listen for him in the bleachers, shouting your name. Too tired to continue? He’ll carry you. Too discouraged to fight? He’s picking you up. God is for you.” Max Lucado, In the Grip of Grace
Pre-Reading Words for Activity
1st 100 Words to Know:
a, about, after, again, all, an, and, any, are, as, at, be, been, before, boy, but, by, can, come, day, did, do, down, eat, for, from, get, give, go, good, had, has, have, he, her, here, him, his, how, I, if, in, is, it, just, know, good, little, long, make, man, many, me, much, my, new, no, not, of, old, on, one, or, other, our, out, put, said, see, she, so, some, take, that, the, their, them, then, there, they, this, three, to, put, said, us, very, was, we, were, what, when, which, who, will, with, work, would, you, your, two, up.
 
Pre-Writing

According to the “Child Development Chart” under the category of Fine Motor, here are some "milesontes" to look for in your child's development:

(Remember these tend to be general but remember all children develop at their own pace.)

6 months Picks up a toy with one hand. Looks at and reaches for faces and toys

9 months Transfers toy from one hand to the other. Uses two hands to pick up large objects.

12 months Picks up small objects- precise thumb and finger grasp.

18 months Stacks two or more blocks. Picks up two small toys in one hand. Scribbles with crayon.

2 years Builds towers of four or more blocks. Turns pages of picture books, one at a time.

2 years 6 months Scribbles with circular motion. Draws or copies vertical lines.

3 years Cuts with small scissors.

3 years 6 months Draws or copies a complete circle. Cuts across paper with small scissors.

4 years Draws recognizable pictures.

4 years 6 months Draws a person that has at least three parts – head, eyes, nose, mouth, etc.

5 years Prints first name (four letters).