Pre Social Studies

Dad, Hunter, even joins in to the skating party with daughter, to help Courtlyn master her new skill... Thanks, Dad!!
DECEMBER PRE-SOCIAL STUDIES ACTIVITIES


The Pre-Social Studies objectives we will be looking at today will be in the category of “People & How They Live.” The focus will be on learning social skills.

WORDS KIDS NEED TO HEAR:
“…When a parent believes in you, you begin to believe in yourself.” Pg 15

“Anyone can compliment good grades at the end of a semester. I’m glad I didn’t miss the real success that happened every night along the way.” Pg 22

“The choices a parent makes will either validate or undermine the message “you can count on me.” Pg 40

Big Question #1
“Is my child convinced that I truly believe in him/her?
A child will more likely trust that God believes in her when she feels confident in your belief first.
Big Question #2
“Does my child believe that he or she can count on me?”
When parental reliability exists, the leap to trusting God becomes an easier step for kids to make.


ACTIVITIES TO CHALLENGE HIGHER-LEVEL THINKING SKILLS:
*Christmas has so many wonderful songs that go along with the joyful season. Do you have an enjoyable CD whose words the children have learned? To create a noisy, fun microphone, you will need a bell and a long pipe cleaner. Thread the pipe cleaner into the bell, placing the bell at the halfway point. Fold the pipe cleaner in half and twist the sides together for a long handle. This can act either as a pretend microphone or be shaken for different part of the song.

*Create a manger out of blocks and role play the baby Jesus in the stable with the animals. Grass can be used for hay for the animals. Provide a strip of cloth to wrap around Jesus. If you don’t have little dolls for props, cut out Mary, Joseph and Baby Jesus from an old Christmas card. Glue onto Popsicle sticks or tape to a smaller block for a prop.

Reading stories about the first Christmas will fuel the role playing of that eventful day.

Before going shopping with your little one, give him a few pennies for his pocket. Each time you come across a bell ringer, have your little one take out a penny and place in the bucket.


Questions to challenge higher level thinking:
Babies will begin to become aware of family members.
Infants to 18 months may not want to share their toys with cousins and the word “mine” may ring out. This is part of economic concepts and the beginning to understand trade as “goods and services.”
Toddlers may begin to take turns with others if they have adult guidance and encouragement.
3-year-olds begin to discriminate between yours and mine and may begin to share objects with others.
Starting with 3 year olds on up, provide simple single tasks for various members of the family at mealtime. Give a spoon to each family member for cereal in the morning.
Once the big day arrives, the preschool children may be able to perform a simple task when the grandparents are there. For example, give each member of the family a special Thanksgiving napkin for the meal.
During the month, see if you can check out a simple book on manners from the library. You will be amazed at the wonderful suggestions. Practice during the month so they are ready when guests come over.
After dinner, have your child share some favorite pictures about the year from scrapbooks. Perhaps grandparents would be able to hold and rock them or sit by them on the couch and talk about their childhood. If you have an opportunity to audio tape these stories, it would be fun to turn these into a simple picture book with your child. Have them illustrate the grandparent’s story to give to them for Christmas. Wonderful memories for the future.

With infants to toddlers, it is helpful if you have more than one object that is nearly the same. It may cut down on “mine” wars.

Materials:
TEACHABLE MOMENTS
1. Maintain eye contact.
2. Be at their eye level.
3. Positively touch or hold them.
4. Share ideas. Ask questions.
5. Most important – Listen to them.

Questions and thoughts to challenge higher level thinking:
1. A child’s intellectual development is intertwined with their feelings.
2. A child’s positive self-esteem contributes to later school success.
3. From the security you develop in your young child’s life, he will learn that his world is a safe place to venture out into and explore…the place where tons of learning takes place.
4. Positive comments to work into the day:
“I believe in you.”
“Wow, you are really improving!”
“I knew you could do it if you kept trying.”
“Every day you improve!”
“You’re on the right track now.”
“You almost have it.”

5. At the end of the day, right before they go to sleep, pray with them and thank God for some of the positive character qualities you see in them like sharing with their sibling.







Social Studies Standard 2: Demonstrates an understaning of basic geographic concepts.
Benchmark 2.1: Demonstrates an understanding of the relationships between people and places.

Age 1: From construction paper or typing paper, cut out some large Valentine Hearts that are about 1 foot in diameter. Place a face on each heart. Place the hearts in various rooms around the house (on mirror, on front door, hanging in the kitchen, on refrigerator, by changing table). As you are carrying the baby around in the morning, take a tour of your house and visit each of the Valentine Faces. Let your baby pat on each one, or if they are hanging, they can reach for it. Eventually they may anticipate which one will come next and already begin looking for it when you enter the room.

Age 2: If you are teaching your child to walk up the stairs holding onto the railing; then place 2 hearts side by side on the stairs and teach your child to walk on the hearts as they learn to climb the stairs. By holding the railing and placing both feet on each stair, they can walk on each of the hearts. By the time Valentines Day is over, your child will have learned to climb the stairs.

Age 3: Create a village out of blocks. Cut small hearts and place one on each of the buildings.

Age 4: After the village has been created, take time to draw a picture of it. This will begin them thinking of the harder concept of “maps.” Perhaps if you have more of the little red hearts, you can put those on the map as well in the same spots.

Age 5: As you interact with your child, keep in mind the use of key concepts in creating teachable moments. Look through the website for the quick powerpoint on creating teachable moments. Look for those times when you are doing the 5 key points. See if you can add in some of the suggested phrases to build your child’s self-esteem.
Words Kids Need to Hear by David Staal,
“…When a parent believes in you, you begin to believe in yourself.” Pg 15

“Anyone can compliment good grades at the end of a semester. I’m glad I didn’t miss the real success that happened every night along the way.” Pg 22

“The choices a parent makes will either validate or undermine the message “you can count on me.” Pg 40

Big Question #1
“Is my child convinced that I truly believe in him/her?
A child will more likely trust that God believes in her when she feels confident in your belief first.

Big Question #2
“Does my child believe that he or she can count on me?”
When parental reliability exists, the leap to trusting God becomes an easier step for kids to make.
 
TOOLS FOR MOTHERHOOD GRADUATES are sharing some of the Pre-Social Studies activities they tried with their own children.

Cooking Role PlayingHeather of Topeka
The other thing was not even planned but all pretend play for the girls. I cut open one of those red netting bags that apples and oranges come in and the girls put them on their heads as hair nets and then they “cooked” in their little kitchen. What a great social studies lesson where the girls got to pretend to be cooks or deli workers (like the deli people wear at Wal Mart Zoe said). It was a great, not even planned, thing where I got to actually use everyday things to teach them something. Soo much fun!!



9 Months old, Peek a boo By Joanna, Topeka

If you put a blanket over his head, he will pull it off and grin at you. He also likes it when I put my hands over my face, he pulls them down and I say peek a boo! If I'm around the corner and I say "where's Benny" he's looking for me when I come around the corner and say peek a book.

Recommendations: Yes, its fun because my son enjoye it so much.

4 Years Old, Chutes and Ladders By Heather, Topeka

I had Zoe "set up" the game board and then we picked out the player she wanted to be which was the little blond girl-of course. I was the little boy in overalls. Then she would spin and move. Then it was my turn and so on. Zoe tends to "get lost" on which way to go when she gets to an end as we tend to do thing from top to bottom-so this is backwards and then to go both left and right gets confusing too, so we really try to get her to "read" the numbers in order so its not as confusing, but still... (We stop and explain how doing good things get rewarded and bad things have consequences.) It is one of our favorite games to play.

Recommendations: Yes, great lessons and fun too.


9 Months Standing in front of a light switch, I showed him how to trn it on and off. Then I helped him, and pretty soon he figured it out himself. Whe we went to a different room, he was able to remember what to do at a different switch. He was not only learning cause & effect, but he was also proud of himself and what he could cause to happen. --Joanna

3 Years Old I painted my daughters hands with washable paint and had her do a hand print of each hand on a piece of paper. Then we wrote on the paper all the roles she has in her life and how much she is a very important person to God! She is a daughter, granddtr, greatgranddtr, niece, cousin, and most importantly a child of God's! This activity was fun but very messy. : ) She enjoyed having her hands pained through. Any recommendations might be: It was a great and an awesome opportunity to talk about Jesus with her. For Christmas, we could make handprints on tissue paper or white wrapping paper. Once the handprints were dry on the paper, we could wrap the gift to the grandparents. --Kahle

4 1/2 Years Old We made a book called "All about Me". Ahead of time, I cut out scrapbook pages of ideas for her to choose from. We stappled several blank typing pages together and at the top of each page we thought of a heading of things about her. Some ideas were: My favorite food, my favorite pets, my favorite toys, my favorite colors. Then she would take a pair of sissors and cut and glue what she wanted on each page. It was so fun to just sit down together and talk. She really had some great answers that really surprised me. This will become one of those keepsakes to cherish in years to come. It was sure fun to find out what their favorite things were.--Heather